Shanghai Film Museum Photos

July 13, 2013
The hanging props at the newly opened, tastefully designed and arranged Shanghai Film Museum, including a real jeep used in filming From Victory to Victory, a post-1949 film about the Chinese civil war.

The hanging props at the newly opened, tastefully designed and arranged Shanghai Film Museum, including a real jeep used in filming From Victory to Victory, a post-1949 film about the Chinese civil war.

This Lianhua-owned 35mm NEWALL camera, manufactured in the 1930s by the NEWALL Company in Peterborough, the United Kingdom, has a 4-lens revolving stand base, capable of mounting Cooke Speed Panchro lens.  This camera was used to shoot a number of Lianhua classics, including Little Toys, The Goddess, Big Road, Song of the Fishermen, and Lianhua Symphony.

This Lianhua-owned 35mm NEWALL camera, manufactured in the 1930s by the NEWALL Company in Peterborough, the United Kingdom, has a 4-lens revolving stand base, capable of mounting Cooke Speed Panchro lens. This camera was used to shoot a number of Lianhua classics, including Little Toys, The Goddess, Big Road, Song of the Fishermen, and Lianhua Symphony.

One of my favorite displays dedicated to China's "Golden Voice" Zhou Xuan.

One of my favorite displays dedicated to China’s “Golden Voice” Zhou Xuan.

Duisenberg Town Car, manufactured in the United States in 1936. As a film prop beginning in the 1940s, it was featured in nearly 100 Shanghai-themed films and TV dramas.

Duisenberg Town Car, manufactured in the United States in 1936. As a film prop beginning in the 1940s, it was featured in nearly 100 Shanghai-themed films and TV dramas.

The tastefully arranged rest area, featuring equipment kits, lights, and, hopefully, great coffee.

The tastefully arranged rest area, featuring equipment kits, lights, and, hopefully, great coffee.

A re-staged scene about the making of Crows and Sparrows (1949).

A re-staged scene about the making of Crows and Sparrows (1949).

Walking along the “Avenue of Stars”, visitors will be bathed in the limelight and feel the same glow and glory that belong to a star.

Walking along the “Avenue of Stars”, visitors will be bathed in the limelight and feel the same glow and glory that belong to a star.

The making of Street Angel (1937); notice on the right corner the two screens feature the trumpet player and the singsong girl.

The making of Street Angel (1937); notice on the right corner the two screens feature the trumpet player and the singsong girl.

Sculpture of Ruan Lingyu and Butterfly Wu (Hu Die; standing), the two most famous actresses in early Chinese cinema.

Sculpture of Ruan Lingyu and Butterfly Wu (Hu Die; standing), the two most famous actresses in early Chinese cinema.


Post-Asian New Talent Award Party, SIFF 2013

July 9, 2013

Last month, the most important film event in China was the 2013 Shanghai International Film Festival. In addition to some remastered old films and the grand opening of the much anticipated Shanghai Film Museum, which was a huge success, the most meaningful program of SIFF was the Asian New Talent Award, which included 10 nominees from across Asia. The official jury was led by Lu Chuan, the young and ambitious Chinese filmmaker best known in the world for his Kekexili: Mountain Patrol (2004) and City of Life and Death (2009) and included veteran producer Gary Kurtz and critic Aruna Vasudev as well as young actress Laura Weissbecker (CZ 12).

South Korean director Roh Doek, Singaporean director Wong Chen-hsi and Chinese director Liu Juan at the 2013 SIFF Asian New Talent Award ceremony held on June 21, 2013.

South Korean director Roh Doek (left), Singaporean director Wong Chen-hsi (center) and Chinese director Liu Juan (right) at the 2013 SIFF Asian New Talent Award ceremony held on June 21, 2013.

The jury presented three awards to three films, and, amazingly, all of them were directed by women filmmakers: Best Feature award went to South Korea’s Roh Doek (Very Ordinary Couple) with a cash prize of RMB 150,000 (approximately 25,000 US$), Best Director award went to Singapore’s Wong Chen-hsi (Innocents) with a cash prize of RMB 150,000 (approximately 25,000 US$), and Jury Special Mention went to China’s Liu Juan (Singing When We Are Young).

With the Asian New Talent Award Jury and awarded filmmaker (back row from left: Choi Dong-hoon, South Korean Film Director/Writer; Ms. Roh Doek, Best Feature winner from South Korea for her "Very Ordinary;" Ms. Shen Yang, SIFF staff; Gary Kurtz, US Film Producer, best known for “American Graffiti” and “Star Wars;” front row: second from left is French actress Laura Weissbecker, and third from left is Aruna Vasudev from India).

With the Asian New Talent Award Jury and awarded filmmaker (back row from left: Choi Dong-hoon, South Korean Film Director/Writer; Ms. Roh Doek, Best Feature winner from South Korea for her “Very Ordinary Couple;” Ms. Shen Yang, SIFF staff; Gary Kurtz, US Film Producer, best known for “American Graffiti” and “Star Wars;” front row: second from left is French actress Laura Weissbecker, and third from left is Aruna Vasudev from India).